Beverages

King of Wines

‘The wine of kings and the king of wines,’ raved England’s Richard the Lionheart at the start of the 12 century during the third crusade when he and his troops occupied Cyprus and tasted the local wine. The first historical source when Cypriot wine was mentioned goes as far back as Homer. This makes the Cypriot Nama about 5,000 years old and therefore the oldest wine in the world. 


A date with the Green Fairy

Oscar Wilde, Pablo Picasso, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Vincent van Gogh and Ernest Hemingway all had one thing in common: they loved absinthe. And they were not the only ones. The Green Fairy or La Bleue, as the drink was called in Switzerland during the years when it was banned, enjoyed great popularity in the 19th century. 


Hops, malt and lemongrass

Beer belongs to Ireland like pubs and smoked salmon. It is surprising that on the green island the micro-brewing culture has developed very late compared with neighbouring England. ‘Micro-breweries have only become a nation-wide trend since 2014,’ says Claire Dalton. Together with her husband, Tom, brother Cormac and his wife Jen they belong to the pioneers of the micro-brewing scene in Ireland.


A hairy idea

An old cow, a wonderful estate in Ireland and an unusual gin. This is what this story is about, and in just that order. Everything began on New Year’s Eve in 1993 at the Blackwater Tavern in the small village of Sneem in the west of Ireland. The gathering there that night was not in celebration of the New Year, but of a much sadder occasion, the wake of a famous local, Bertha.


Living off your own back

When Jaques’ father passed away, both he and his family were confronted with a dilemma; to continue living in the south of France where Jaques had been working as a vintner in a large vineyard for many years, or to return to Brittany where his parents’ farm had remained unproductive since the 1980’s. The majority of the land was on lease and the apple orchards close to the farm were overgrown with weeds. (...)


A product behind which stands a lot of history and stories

Ivan Milos has to stop shortly in order to install the four-wheel drive of his jeep. The last third of the vineyard is steep and the ground loose and stony. However, the Croatian vintner knows why he has brought us up to top of the valley. 

The view from here is spectacular. To the right lies the deep blue waters of the Adriatic and to the left the rugged hills which form this half-island, Peljesac. Beneath our feet is a terraced landscape full of vines, all of which belong to the family run vineyard named, Vinarija Milos. (...)